Charles Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening” – December 1, Evening — Theology Mix

“O that men would praise the Lord for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men.” -Psalm 107:8 If we complained less, and praised more, we should be happier, and God would be more glorified. Let us daily praise God for common mercies–common as we frequently call them, and yet so…

via Charles Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening” – December 1, Evening — Theology Mix

I know I just posted another Morning and Evening, but I really wanted to write a bit on this one too because this was honestly one of my favorite ones to record so far.  We in the USA just celebrated Thanksgiving, a tradition that we think of as going back to the Pilgrims of Plymouth Colony and to later presidential declarations of such days, including George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.

I was intending to do a sermon episode on it with this sermon, but with the time crunch as well as falling ill, that will probably be done next year around the same holiday, God willing.

The power of gratitude

I wanted to take a moment here and talk about why as Christians, this occasion should be particularly meaningful to us.  We should, as a natural course of living, be constantly thankful to God, and I believe it goes hand in hand with the biblical command to rejoice in the Lord in all things.  We should remember that our lives, our families and homes, our very existence, and most of all our salvation in Christ, is a gift of God’s goodness and love to us.  Certainly, however, it is appropriate for us in this season when we begin to close out the year and reflect on everything that has happened, to make time as a nation to stop and give special gratitude to God.

Gratitude is also one of the believer’s greatest weapons against the temptation to run to sin.  Someone who hopes in the cross and pours out his gratitude on the unending grace of God can endure the darkest pits.  My own experiences have only grazed the truth of this, but the goodness and grace of God is so very sweet after a deep draught of sadness and suffering, and a time of thanksgiving is all the more appropriate in that time.

I have said before that I believe two important commands we find in Scripture are “rejoice” and “do not fear,” both of which are tied into the idea of loving the Lord with every element of your self, and which overflow into loving your neighbor as yourself.  I am reminded most of all of this passage from Hebrews:

Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God.–Hebrews 12:1-2

Such an amazing picture of the strength we can find in God is seen here!  Christ set the example for all His people by enduring not just giving up His heavenly throne to live as a servant, but enduring the torment of death on a cross, doing so because He knew the joy that would come of it, of the coming perfect union between Christ and His church, was far more valuable than the shame meted out to him in such an ignominious death.

I am constantly holding myself up against this, and I fall so very short.  Yet even knowing that drives me to further gratitude, because the immense and glorious grace of God is more than enough to fill that gap, and to grow me up further.  I pray that I will always keep this weapon at hand, as I go forth into the next part of life and into whatever God has planned for me there.

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Charles Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening” – November 30, Evening

“Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels.” -Revelation 12:7 War always will rage between the two great sovereignties until one or other be crushed. Peace between good and evil is an impossibility; the very pretence of it would, in fact, be the triumph of the powers of…

via Charles Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening” – November 30, Evening — Theology Mix

I got a little sick over Thanksgiving weekend and got behind in these, I will be pushing to get them caught up and ahead so this doesn’t happen again around Christmas.  Follow the link to hear and subscribe to Theology Mix on your podcast catcher for the twice-daily feed.

Morning and Evening devotionals – an update

As many of you may have noticed, the Morning and Evening devotional podcast made it last year from August through about the end of October, and then stopped.  Unfortunately life wasn’t really cooperating with me, plus I also had equipment failure that compounded things, and so I basically decided to put it aside for the time being.

I’ve shared a couple here, but I wanted to make the announcement official: the updates have resumed and will continue to roll out twice daily thanks to the good folks at Theology Mix.  It is a lot of work to create 730 episodes, but it is a blessing to me and God willing it will continue apace until finally, the entire series is able to run essentially until it just can’t anymore for one reason or another.

Please consider subscribing to the Theology Mix podcast feed, because for now that is the exclusive home of those updates.  My regular episodes will continue to roll out here and there also, plus there are many other podcasts in their feed which you can download and many great writers over there to check out daily.

I am hoping to put out at least one more if not two more episodes before Thanksgiving, but it depends on time.  Please pray for me that I will use my time wisely, between working, serving my church and working on this project.

Charles Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening” – November 11, Morning — Theology Mix

“Underneath are the everlasting arms.” –Deuteronomy 33:27 God–the eternal God–is himself our support at all times, and especially when we are sinking in deep trouble. There are seasons when the Christian sinks very low in humiliation. Under a deep sense of his great sinfulness, he is humbled before God till he scarcely knows how to…

via Charles Spurgeon’s “Morning and Evening” – November 11, Morning — Theology Mix

Follow the link for the podcast and subscribe to the Theology Mix feed in your favorite podcast catcher for twice-daily updates.

Morning and Evening: an update

We are closing in on the end of our first month releasing audio recordings of the Morning and Evening devotional through Theology Mix.  I wanted to thank Ryan Jackson, Len Flack and Cody Almanzar for being a part of creating these, and I am excited to see this through to the end of the book.  I’d also like to thank Jeremy Lundmark for bringing Spurgeon Audio into the ThM fold and encouraging me as I’ve pursued production of this podcast.

I think I wasn’t quite prepared at first for the scope of a project this size, even if each episode is only a couple minutes long.  But I am glad that it has gone so smoothly to date and I am hopeful that this has a positive impact on listeners.  If you have listened and enjoyed, please share them with your friends and family.  I am planning to keep these available for free download indefinitely.

If you are subscribed to the Spurgeon Audio RSS feed and wonder why you aren’t getting these twice-daily updates, it’s because they aren’t coming through that feed.  You should make sure you subscribe to Theology Mix through iTunes or your favorite podcast catcher, and you will be able to receive these daily, in addition to being able to follow several other excellent podcasts as well.

You can listen to and read all the Morning and Evening episodes released to date here, and don’t forget to follow Spurgeon Audio on Facebook and Twitter.  If there are sermons you’d like to hear recorded, email me and we will add them to our list for the future.

SAmorning

Official announcement: Morning and Evening!

Ever since this podcast started, probably the biggest question Jon and I have fielded is “Will you record the Morning and Evening devotionals?”  And to be honest, that was the idea that prompted the creation of this podcast, but a day by day release of the devotional was a little outside my technical ability and budget.

Now though: thanks to the assistance of the Theology Mix network and three fellow podcasters, this wish from so many will be a reality!  You may remember Ryan Jackson from our heaven double-feature, and I will also be joined by Len Flack of Renewal Media and North Country Fellowship Church, and Cody Almanzar of The Ordinary Pastor podcast.

This will be kicking off next month, and will be exclusive to the Theology Mix podcast network.  If you haven’t subscribed to the TM RSS feed yet, this is a great reason to do so.  I will post more once we are about to begin posting, but right now the plan is to begin releasing on August 1.  Bookmark it!

Morning and Evening – Good Friday

Happy Good Friday to all those who have begun to follow this podcast as we slowly figure out what exactly we’re doing here.  Today is a day to celebrate the death of death, and the payment made in full for our sins by the Lord Jesus Christ!  We will be releasing Episode 4 very soon.  In the meantime, I present this morning’s entry from Charles Spurgeon’s Morning and Evening devotional:

April 3 – Morning

They took Jesus, and led him away.
John 19:16

He had been all night in agony, he had spent the early morning at the hall of Caiaphas, he had been hurried from Caiaphas to Pilate, from Pilate to Herod, and from Herod back again to Pilate; he had, therefore, but little strength left, and yet neither refreshment nor rest were permitted him.  They were eager for his blood, and therefore led him out to die, loaded with the cross.  O dolorous procession!  Well may Salem’s daughters weep.  My soul, do thou weep also.

What learn we here as we see our blessed Lord led forth?  Do we not perceive that truth which was set forth in shadow by the scapegoat?  Did not the high-priest bring the scapegoat, and put both his hands upon its head, confessing the sins of the people, that thus those sins might be laid upon the goat, and cease from the people?  Then the goat was led away by a fit man into the wilderness, and it carried away the sins of the people, tso that if they were sought for they could not be found.  Now we see Jesus brought before the priests and rulers, who pronounce him guilty; God himself imputes our sins to him, The Lord hath laid on him the iniquity of us all; He was made sin for us; and, as the substitute for our guilt, bearing our sin upon his shoulders, represented by the cross; we see the great Scapegoat led away by the appointed officers of justice.  Beloved, can you feel assured that he carried your sin?  As you look at the cross upon his shoulders, does it represent your sin?  There is one way by which you can tell whether he carried your sin or not.  Have you laid your hand upon his head, confessed your sin, and trusted in him?  Then your sin lies not on you; it has all been transferred by blessed imputation to Christ, and he bears it on his shoulder as a load heavier than the cross.

Let not the picture vanish till you have rejoiced in your own deliverance, and adored the loving Redeemer upon whom your iniquities were laid.